The People in the Castle Selected Strange Stories Here is the whisper in the night the dog whose loyalty outlasted death the creak upstairs the half remembered ghost story that won t let you sleep the sound that raises gooseflesh the wish you d

  • Title: The People in the Castle: Selected Strange Stories
  • Author: Joan Aiken Lizza Aiken
  • ISBN: 9781618731128
  • Page: 498
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Here is the whisper in the night, the dog whose loyalty outlasted death, the creak upstairs, the half remembered ghost story that won t let you sleep, the sound that raises gooseflesh, the wish you d checked the lock on the door before dark fell Here are tales of suspense and the supernatural that will chill, amuse, and exhilarate.

    • ↠ The People in the Castle: Selected Strange Stories || ê PDF Read by ç Joan Aiken Lizza Aiken
      498 Joan Aiken Lizza Aiken
    • thumbnail Title: ↠ The People in the Castle: Selected Strange Stories || ê PDF Read by ç Joan Aiken Lizza Aiken
      Posted by:Joan Aiken Lizza Aiken
      Published :2020-07-19T13:58:47+00:00

    About "Joan Aiken Lizza Aiken"

    1. Joan Aiken Lizza Aiken

      Joan Aiken was a much loved English writer who received the MBE for services to Children s Literature Her most famous classic, THE WOLVES OF WILLOUGHBY CHASE has been in print for over 50 years with a new AUDIO recorded by her daughter Lizza She was known as a writer of wild fantasy, Gothic novels and unforgettable short storiesW COLLECTION 2016 The People in The Castle book show 2See NEWS NEW PUBLICATIONS at facebook JoanAikenOffFollow THE JOAN AIKEN BLOG at joanaiken.wordpress For Joan s life and full Bibliography visit joanaiken Joan s Life in brief She was born in Rye, East Sussex, into a family of writers, including her father, Conrad Aiken who won a Pulitzer Prize for his poetry , and her sister, Jane Aiken Hodge.She worked for the United Nations Information Office during the second world war,and then as an editor and freelance on Argosy magazine before she started writing full time, mainly children s books and thrillers For her books she received the Guardian Award 1969 and the Edgar Allan Poe Award 1972.Her most popular series, the Wolves Chronicles which began with The Wolves of Willoughby Chase , was set in an elaborate alternate period of history in a Britain in which James II was never deposed in the Glorious Revolution,and so supporters of the House of Hanover continually plot to overthrow the Stuart Kings These books also feature cockney urchin heroine Dido Twite and her adventures and travels all over the world.Another series of children s books about Arabel and her raven Mortimer are illustrated by Quentin Blake, and have been shown on the BBC as Jackanory and drama series Others including the much loved Necklace of Raindrops and award winning Kingdom Under the Sea are illustrated by Jan Pie kowski.Her many novels for adults include several that continue or complement novels by Jane Austen These include Mansfield Revisited and Jane Fairfax.Aiken was a lifelong fan of ghost stories She set her adult supernatural novel The Haunting Of Lamb House at Lamb House in Rye now a National Trust property This ghost story recounts in fictional form an alleged haunting experienced by two former residents of the house, Henry James and E F Benson, both of whom also wrote ghost stories Aiken s father, Conrad Aiken, also authored a small number of notable ghost stories.

    860 thoughts on “The People in the Castle: Selected Strange Stories”

    1. Joan Aiken stories handpicked by Small Beer Press and Aiken's daughter and with an introduction by Kelly Link?!! I couldn't read this fast enough! Aiken, probably best known for The Wolves of Willoughby Chase, wrote over 100 books, including 28 story collections. HOLY CATS. These selected stories are wildly inventive, fantastical, and funny, and certainly for fans of Link. I am so delighted this exists.Tune in to our weekly podcast dedicated to all things new books, All The Books: bookriot/categ [...]


    2. I bailed 50% of the way in, because by that point I was hate-reading and that's a bloody waste of time. Out of the 10.3 stories I read, I only really liked one, "Listening," a quirky, rich tale about art and passion and cats that was a work of art itself. Not one of the others here measured up, and several just angered me the way only unsatisfying fiction can do.


    3. I loved these short stories! They all felt timeless, like a fairy tale, but yet they somehow felt quite modern at the same time. They all had a slight twist at the end, slightly unnerving, a little unexpected, never truly sinister or suspenseful. But yet they are quite compelling. I can totally see Ms. Aiken becoming one of my new favorite authors.


    4. This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers."The People in the Castle" is a collection of previously published short stories by Joan Aiken, dating between 1955 and 1990. The stories range from fantasy to horror to science fiction, from whimsical (“A Room Full of Leaves,” “Humblepuppy”) to scary (“The Cold Flame”) to mythology-based (“The Lame King”) to very funny indeed (“A Portable Elephant”) - in short, an absolutely delightful collection of imaginative and inv [...]


    5. Is it possible to review a book of Joan Aiken short stories without using a variation on the phrase, "endlessly creative"?Apparently not.


    6. What a great collection of dark stories from Ms. Aiken. She has long been a favorite of mine, and has the same eerie quality to her stories as does Shirley Jackson. You start out on one path of plot, only to suddenly find yourself somewhere else entirely, as the world tilts a bit off kilter and becomes fey and frightening. This is the second volume of collected stories of Ms. Aiken's work published by Small Beer Press. They're beautiful books, both in appearance and content. Highly recommended.


    7. I dare you to read the first page of the first story and not become so charmed you'll want to immediately buy a copy ASAP. Enchanting, Clever and Highly Original.


    8. I'm embarrassed to say this is my introduction to the work of Joan Aiken and I now know just how much my childhood was lacking. These are delicious, delirious, dangerous, dark tales that spring from the well of dreams and fables, fairy tales and deeply buried fears. Checked this out from the local library and will be purchasing for my home library; that just how good these stores are.


    9. The stories presented within this collection were certainly entertaining and unique and I found myself retelling them to my aunt who's a big fan of the genre herself. One thing which did cross both our minds was that had these been superimposed into movies or tiny episodes-they'd definitely be worth watching so there was substance in each. I highly recommend this for a younger audience. :)


    10. If you like Angela Carter, you will like Joan Aiken. Not as detailed and rich, but is imaginative and original. I recommend this collection 100%


    11. My first encounter with Joan Aiken - I'll definitely look for more. Felt like reading grown-up fairy tales, with a sense of humor.



    12. Highly entertaining, imaginative, slightly child-oriented stories that easily sit alongside Connie Willis and Susanna Clarke.


    13. This is a collection of short stories most of which are weird and strange. I enjoyed the description of how to write a short story as to a novel. How to make your words count. The "one" short story I enjoyed was of a teacher who taught listening in a sound proof room. She had tapes of different places - "you'll hear the grasses and far off you'll hear the sea and after 5 minutes you'll hear drums"-----"This one was taken in Denmark in the bogs - can you hear the reeds and the dry rushes?"It made [...]


    14. When I was a kid I read every Joan Aiken book I could get my hands on, and this new collection of dark-edged and very British stories is a good reminder of why I liked her so much. My favourites: Some Music for the Wicked Countess (which now reminds me of Susanna Clarke's fairies); The Dark Streets of Kimball's Green (which has some echoes of Hans Christian Andersen); The Lame King (atmospheric and satisfying); The Last Specimen (where a rector handles a fantasy/science fiction situation with a [...]


    15. I didn't get a chance to read every story but I enjoyed the first half of the book's stories. It is probably a little strange that I enjoyed Kelly Link's introduction the very most but she is my very favorite.


    16. Wonderful ~ very clever and unique. I'm looking forward to reading more of Joan Aiken.*My life, he thought, is assembled out of an endless procession of unimportant choices."



    17. I see where people would enjoy this but my lack of interest in fairy tales and fantasy kept me from loving these stories.



    18. Full disclosure: I'm pretty sure I requested this book to review because I thought it was written by Jenny Jaeckel, which is sort of similar sounding to Joan Aiken, but not really. Oh brain, the tricks you play on me. But it turns out I have read Joan Aiken; I've readThe Wolves of Willoughby Chase and was not particularly enthused about the whole thing.The Wolves of Willoughby Chase is of a very specific English style. I remember thinking it was dry. Maybe gin martini dry. Maybe dead leaf dry. A [...]



    19. The more I read this book, the more I liked it. No, I loved it. It is a weird little book. There is an element of supernatural or perhaps magical realism to each of the stories. They are often referred to as dark, and indeed, there is often menace, threat of death, and actual death, but there is a whimsical quality that lightens the darkness. There are lovers who run off together. There are vulnerable children who are protected by mysterious forces (reminding me of Roald Dahl, or of fairy tales) [...]


    20. Disclosure: I received an e-galley copy of this book through Edelweiss.This was one of several collections of 'strange stories' - magical, weird, unsettling collections that don't pack neatly into a genre label - that I read this year. Many of them, including this one, are almost like fairy tales, and I'd describe Aiken's as more like the original Grimm's fairy tales, pretty horror stories, than anything else.Many of the stories focus on children experiencing the fantastic in their dire situatio [...]


    21. Stories: 5 stars. Editing: 1 star. After doing an amazing job with their Armitage story collection, and collecting the uncollected work of Aiken in "The Monkey's Wedding," they really blew it with this one, which is absurdly short for the price ($24 for 250 pages!?), especially considering how prolific the author was; how welcome would have been a really substantial collection of her consistently outstanding work! A greater grievance, however, is the copyediting: the stories average about 5 or 6 [...]


    22. I wanted to like this more than I actually did, I'm afraid. None of the stories were even remotely bad. They're Aiken's work after all. I just think I'd probably have picked different stories were I creating an anthology.Of course, it may well be that the difficulty is that Aiken wrote so very many different types of stories. This anthology seems, based on the introductory material, to be an attempt to include the best examples of everything. That's likely to include, for most readers familiar w [...]


    23. I know it's only June, but I'm gonna go ahead and call it: Favorite Book of 2016 right here. Of course the short stories in this collection were all written between 1955 and 1990, but they're entirely new to me, and I mean that in every sense of the word. Aiken, in what seems to me almost a miracle, brings fairy tales solidly into the contemporary world (or at least the mid to late 20th-century world when Aiken was writing). So kings, countesses, princesses, enchanted forests and castles and ani [...]


    24. I liked about half of the stories, including A Portable Elephant, A Room Full of Leaves, Humblepuppy, and the last 4 stories. The other stories were ok but I felt the endings were kind of flat. No great twists but interesting (magical/whimsical) ideas presented in this collection of short stories from the author's entire career. I like the author's story-telling style, which may be why I liked Wolves of Willoughby Chase and her other children's books that I read in the 1970's. It's worth a read! [...]


    25. I really enjoyed this collection of stories. They were quirky and strange and perfect for rereading, as half of them didn't make much sense the first time around. I'm not quite sure how I feel about this particular edition - the cover was pretty (and is the reason why I bought it in the first place), but there are several awful typos in almost every story. It seems like no one did any copyediting before it was sent to the printer.


    26. WOW! I was really not expecting to read such wonderfully weird stories! I've never heard of this author before, I now love her! There's just something deeply soothing to me about her tales, as if the all take place on a slightly warm October twilight, right when the sun as set but you can still see hints of its light over the horizon. And the wind is slightly up, blowing faint scent of pumpkin and a warm cooked meal through the trees. Love it.


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